Email #240: “regardless of political affiliation”?

One year ago today, on August 4, 2016, former CIA chief John Brennan warned Russia not to interfere in the U.S. election:

“I said that all Americans, regardless of political affiliation or whom they might support in the election, cherish their ability to elect their own leaders without outside interference or disruption. I said American voters would be outraged by any Russian attempt to interfere in the election.”

If you had asked me a year ago if Brennan’s assessment of Americans was accurate, I would have said yes. In fact, since Republicans have long fostered a reputation for patriotism and the need for strong national defense, I would have thought Republicans would have been especially outraged. I would have been wrong.

Based on the actions of Republicans both in and out of office since Russian election interference was first reported and then unanimously confirmed, it seems Republicans cherish their personal political agendas more than their nation’s ability to elect leaders without outside interference. You are a primary example. Instead of outrage, you are content with this new status quo. You would rather have a Republican than a Democrat in the White House, even if another country actively and significantly undermined the Democrat in order to promote the Republican.

Your loyalty is to party first, country second. Were CIA Director Brennan and I naive ever to think otherwise?

Author: Chris Gavaler

Chris Gavaler is an associate professor at W&L University, comics editor of Shenandoah, and series editor of Bloomsbury Critical Guides in Comics Studies. He has published two novels: School for Tricksters (SMU 2011) and Pretend I’m Not Here (HarperCollins 2002); and six books of scholarship: On the Origin of Superheroes (Iowa 2015), Superhero Comics (Bloomsbury 2017), Superhero Thought Experiments (with Nathaniel Goldberg, Iowa 2019), Revising Fiction, Fact, and Faith (with Nathaniel Goldberg, Routledge 2020), Creating Comics (with Leigh Ann Beavers, Bloomsbury 2021), and The Comics Form (Bloomsbury forthcoming). His visual work appears in Ilanot Review, North American Review, Aquifer, and other journals.

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