Email #224: “door to bipartisanship”?

Thank you for your form letter regarding the American Health Care Act. Though it mostly repeats your earlier statements, I do appreciate one tiny revision. You first refer to the ACA as “the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare,” instead of simply calling it “Obamacare,” a pejorative term coined by Republicans to attack the law. Although I hope this is a step toward a more reasonable common ground, it also coincides with “Obamacare” no longer being an easy target. A recent poll reported that the ACA has a 50% approval rating, making it a little more than twice as popular as either of the GOP replacement bills, which are polling at only 24%.

Now that two more Republican Senators have refused to support the Senate version of the AHCA, I have heard renewed talk of repealing but not replacing the ACA. President Trump tweeted earlier this week: “Republicans should just REPEAL failing ObamaCare now & work on a new Healthcare Plan that will start from a clean slate. Dems will join in!”

But prospects for a repeal-only bill are even worse. Republican Senator Capito has already rejected the possibility and on good grounds: “Repealing without a replacement would create great uncertainty for individuals who rely on the ACA and cause further turmoil in the insurance markets. We can’t just hope that we will pass a replacement within the next two years. I will only vote to proceed to repeal legislation if I am confident there is a replacement plan that addresses my concerns.”

But the President is right about starting over and working with Democrats this time. Senate Minority Leader Schumer is saying the same thing: “Rather than repeating this same, failed partisan process again, Republicans should work with Democrats on a bill that lowers premiums, provides long-term stability to the insurance markets and improves our health-care system. The door to bipartisanship is open now.” Senator Manchin has already begun that process, contacting eleven other Senators who have served as governors like him and inviting them to “sit down and start bipartisan talking.”

I hope you will help to lead the same process in the House. Congress has been in session for six months and is no closer to passing a new health care bill. It’s time for a bipartisan, centrist approach. This is what our country needs right now.

Author: Chris Gavaler

Chris Gavaler is an associate professor at W&L University, comics editor of Shenandoah, and series editor of Bloomsbury Critical Guides in Comics Studies. He has published two novels: School for Tricksters (SMU 2011) and Pretend I’m Not Here (HarperCollins 2002); and six books of scholarship: On the Origin of Superheroes (Iowa 2015), Superhero Comics (Bloomsbury 2017), Superhero Thought Experiments (with Nathaniel Goldberg, Iowa 2019), Revising Fiction, Fact, and Faith (with Nathaniel Goldberg, Routledge 2020), Creating Comics (with Leigh Ann Beavers, Bloomsbury 2021), and The Comics Form (Bloomsbury forthcoming). His visual work appears in Ilanot Review, North American Review, Aquifer, and other journals.

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